Cassini sending back pictures from Enceladus flyby

Cassini has started to send back pictures from its close flyby of Enceladus, an icy moon of Saturn. The surface of the moon looks rather wrinkly. Perhaps this is because of all the water volcanos on the planet. It's mind-boggling to think that all of that surface is littered with water ice.

Fourth skeet-shoot footprint taken during Cassini's flyby of Enceladus

9 thoughts on “Cassini sending back pictures from Enceladus flyby”

  1. Wow! I just don't see how it could be liquid water as far away from the sun as it is. And IF it is - then what is sooo hot on that moon to keep it liquid?

  2. No doubt the tidal friction with Saturn plays a large part. What fascinates me the most is that icy cold liquid water on Enceladus is like lava in Earth volcanoes, but with eruptions that are much larger.

  3. I obviously don't know much about our solar system ,though I do like to learn, so forgive me if this sounds really stupid ok?
    I thought that "moons" were just basically rock. Or is that just our moon?

    Also ... they were drawn to this moon because they noticed the geysers, correct?

    If they are intrigued enough by Saturn's moon --- are they equally as intriged with ours? Or do they know everything there is to know about it?

    Why aren't they doing more research there?

    Is that enough questions for you?? LoL! :-)

    Sorry about all of the rambling!

  4. You're awesome Yoo! Thank you so much for taking time to answer my silly questions. :-)

    I'm sorry to put you through so much trouble!

    Stacy :-)

  5. Wow! I just don't see how it could be liquid water as far away from the sun as it is. And IF it is - then what is sooo hot on that moon to keep it liquid?

  6. You're awesome Yoo! Thank you so much for taking time to answer my silly questions. :-) <br/><br/>I'm sorry to put you through so much trouble!<br/><br/>Stacy :-)

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